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August 2014
22
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imagineimo:

So, David Yates is in talks to direct Fantastic Beasts.

My instant reaction was “oh please no”, but then I thought about it for a second.

Yes, I have a lot of issues with the four HP films he made. But a big part of those issues was actually with the screenplay. My next biggest issue was with his direction of the characters I fell in love with on the page. Which once again, is partly to do with the fact that there were four directors before him & that of course, the actors had already developed their characters. So while I’ll never appreciate his work on the main series, I’m not going to be able to pass judgement on him directing Fantastic Beasts until I’ve actually seen it.

Remember, JKR wrote the screenplay. This means she’ll be actively involved and have a lot of say. I know that she supposedly had a lot of say as a producer on the last two movies, but the damage was kind of done by then and there is a big difference between producer and the person who writes the script.

Second, we don’t know these characters. Or this story. Fantastic Beasts isn’t based off a book that we’ve already fallen in love with. We’re not going to get made because that’s not how we thought Newt would act when we read that part in the book. We’re not going to have our favourite scenes missing

Hopefully, this will just be a really great trilogy for us to enjoy and learn more things about the world we love.

Completely agree with this

August 2014
22
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deanisanactualprincess:

AND Captain Kirk gave a command! Do not ignore the Captain!  

August 2014
22
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deanisanactualprincess:

August 2014
22

Anonymous asked

I FUCKING HATE TAYLOR SWIFT TOOOO...

LOL.  I usually can’t STAND her… but this new song is really catchy.  I will give her one chance and if the rest of the songs on this new album are about being dumped then I am OUT!  OUT!  Don’t do it Swift!  Just don’t!

August 2014
22

Ugh…

Watching the Raiders lose this much to Greenbay is terrible… but I just can’t turn away from a train wreck.

#Raiders   #Greenbay   #NFL   #Preseason   #football   
August 2014
22
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blackfishsound:

Another photograph of the new calf sighted in the Strait of Gibraltar

blackfishsound:

Another photograph of the new calf sighted in the Strait of Gibraltar

#animals   
August 2014
22

Confession Time…

Okay, so I use to HATE Taylor Swift and everything about her to a point it was disgusting.  I just thought everything about her was wrong.  For a country star she was too pop and was never marketed in my eyes correctly by her team.  Most of all I thought she was just too silly and immature for a girl who seemed to have it all.  The looks, the voice, the smarts, etc. I thought she spent WAY to much time obsessing over her male counterparts while whining too much about how they did her wrong without actually taking responsibility for her own actions.  Despite being a huge draw from the pre-teen, teen and even early college age girls, I thought she was a rather poor role model.  In my eyes I felt that she spent more time playing the victim and mooning over way too many relationships that were more flings then anything serious.  I did not want to hear one more pap story of her dating so and so and then writing a 12 song album about their three month ‘relationship.’  She was starting to become more of a joke then a serious artist after the tenth break up song.  I just couldn’t understand her.  Why chase around all these jerk guys and not spend time learning to love herself and her friendships with the girlfriends that mean more then a guy that is a dime a dozen?  I love a great love song whether it be about heartbreak or finding a soul mate, but her songs were just getting to be too ridiculous to me.  

Well, maybe I am jumping the shark here, but it looks like she finally got it.  I can’t believe I am saying this, but I really LOVE her new song and the video is even CUTER then I expected.  Not only does it make fun of all those different sort of dance styles which at times each and every single one of them can think to highly of themselves to forget what dance is about… having fun!  I also love that instead of singing about this guy or dissing some girl that pissed her off, she is finally turning the tables and on herself.  She is making fun of herself and is finally just being herself.  I love it!  And they are finally categorizing her new album as pop and not country.  Which is the smart thing to do, because the girl hasn’t been country since God knows when!  But kudos on Taylor for having fun with this song and video.  It is really fun to sing and dance along too.  Please release more stuff like this and just be you!  Stop singing about those dopey guys and have fun!  You have the rest of your life to be tied down to some guy!  

And one last point… to the dudes that are crying that Taylor Swift’s video is raciest… you completely missed the point.  She is making fun of all the dancing styles and how ridiculous ALL of them can be in their own weird ways.  If you didn’t get that in the first go (and I heard there was no first go because the person(s) calling racist on Taylor DIDN’T even watch the video) then you are not as Swift as you should be. ;)

August 2014
22
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Nicki Minaj’s Anaconda video doesn’t reinforce black racial stereotypes but Taylor Swift’s Shake It Off does? Have I missed something?

anythingeverythingblog:

I’ll be honest: maybe it’s because I’m not a woman, or maybe it’s because I have only the most fleeting of interests in commercial pop music. But while I’m no person of colour - a term I’ll decline from ever using - I am black. And racial issues are important to me; however, it seems, in recent times, that the words “racial”, “racist”, “stereotypes”, “gender”, “feminism”, “sexuality” and (somewhat regrettably) “twerking” are being thrown around more than the sort of pulpy mush a toddler cares to chuck about at its mother at meal-time from its high-chair. Much was talked about Nicki Minaj’s single Anaconda - from its front cover to its lyrical content - but now focus has been drawn towards its accompanying video.

To say the video is shocking is neither surprising or of any importance: an overwhelming glut of pop music videos now utilise graphic depictions of hypersexuality (not to mention, scantily-clothed women, writhing and dancing) almost ad nauseam. But it’s perhaps the sheer audacity and relentless slurry of excessive sexualised imagery that stuns and bizarrely impresses, if being impressed could actually leave you utterly horrified. This isn’t the talk of a prudish conservatism - I listen to Crass, the Smiths and Bikini Kill, thank you very much - but rather a desperate bemusement at what’s being pumped before my very eyes. Overall, I found the video immensely crass and deliriously sickening; it was disturbing and confusing, and I was completely put off. There is the agreeably valid argument that MInaj’s attempts were to express her female sexuality freely and not in service of any of her male admirers, something it seems very few female pop stars have any control over if one glances their eye over a large proportion of popular music videos. And certainly, it could be argued that my sense of displeasure was a by-product of a video not aimed at me, not preoccupied with titillating and satisfying the male gaze; that Anaconda is a video made by a woman, for women, celebrating her sexuality and sexual independence. I can accept that; I didn’t at all find it in the least bit sexy, but then maybe I’m not supposed to. So then, who is the video for, if not other women? I can’t see it conceivably winning support from all women, especially if lyrics such as “fuck the skinny bitches, fuck the skinny bitches in the club, I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club” are anything to go by: given the enormous pressures put upon women to conform to a particular beauty standard, are these lyrics really that empowering?

Sure, the video may in fact empower many women proud to have a well-endowed backside. But there’s something else troubling me. Is the video really as sexually progressive as it looks? For a video and a song that flirts with the zeitgeist of modern-day cultural feminism and salutes female sexuality as a weapon not to titillate and attract men, it sure does a lot of titillating, not to mention excluding skinnier women: a little inclusiveness, rather than brash self-aggrandising and rampant objectifying, wouldn’t go amiss. In fact, there’s an awful lot of objectification for a video so hung up on female self-expression. And what about that front cover? As a man, I’m challenged by it not to feel somewhat like a voyeur; it’s practically begging for me to look around with a wry, aroused smile to see if anyone else has noticed. (Furthermore, videos that don’t go out of their way to be righteous and wrapped up in vague, muddied feminist rhetoric look almost identical to the uncomfortable, alarmingly sexist, hypersexualised pap of Anaconda and whatever else you’re likely to see on MTV these days; which brings up the question: are they even really sexy?)

Then there’s the other troubling factor in all this: race. When I found out that the disgust I was sharing with the millions of people who didn’t like or, worse, abhorred Miley Cyrus’ twerking phenomenon wasn’t based on the fact that it felt like a convenient, manipulative, focus-grouped, cynical, attention-grabbing and eye-rollingly exasperating piece of boorish sensationalism but that many found it to be a outrageous example of cultural appropriation, I felt a little puzzled. I thought what Miley had done was wrong because it felt like we were being universally exposed to a young teenage girl hopping on a woeful bandwagon and doing some shitty dancing on top of it. I was wrong: it seemed that Cyrus had cultural appropriated “black culture”, a term that I, as a black male, find ridiculously amusing. If twerking and trap music are innate qualities of “black music” then I might as well hand in my Black Person’s Card - the truth is there is no definitive “black culture”; there is however African, African-American and Afro-Caribbean culture. What Miley did may have been popularised by African-Americans but it’d be quite odd to say that they had a monopoly on it. It’s an argument applied to the whitewashing of rock-and-roll - championed by Chuck Berry, made famous by Elvis - but, in a cultural landscape restricted widely, if not exclusively, to Anglo-American society, where the cultures of many (not just races, but subcultural and counter-cultural groups) are being shared and imitated, the proposition that one young white female pop star can’t and shouldn’t propel an apparently underground dance craze to the mainstream - despite its obvious tensions - is absurd.

Which leads us onto the racial issues concerning a rather innocuous video made by controversy-friendly yet by-and-large inoffensive popster Taylor Swift. Her video for the song Shake It Off depicts her and a multi-gendered, multi-racial group of people dancing. There’s a whole host of dance forms on show, from ballet to breakdancing b-boys and body-popping. But, lo and behold, twerking makes its ubiquitous appearance. Swift crawls under the legs of twerkers and gives a rather tame embarrassed giggle. However, the video - inevitably - has attracted criticism from some, not least Earl Sweatshirt who tweeted that the video was “inherently offensive and ultimately harmful…perpetuating black stereotypes to the same demographic of white girls who hide their prejudice by proclaiming their love of the culture”. Such vitriolic attacks made by the rapper despite the fact that he proclaims not to have even watched the video itself, a sad fact that almost laughably renders his passionate denouncement pretty much pointless. Watching the video myself, whatever racial stereotyping that was being displayed, if any at all, no matter how brazen, implicit or even subliminal, could convince me that the video was as bad Earl and others claimed it to be.

Juxtaposing Swift’s Shake It Off and Minaj’s Anaconda is the intentional centrepiece of this article. If the latter doesn’t appear to be perpetuating racial stereotypes but the former is apparently blatantly aware and guilty of it, I feel as if we may be living in a peculiar universe where political correctness is no more a mere matter only taken on up by aged, miserable, priggish, out-of-touch reactionary conservatives (the sorts of people who gladly fall closer to the right-wing of the political spectrum) but a rabid sport now warmly welcomed by teenagers on Twitter, self-righteous bloggers (a group I probably, reluctantly, fall into), the misplaced ideologies and fanaticism of Internet social activists and (ahem) the fringes of more open-minded or liberal politics - and I say that as an ardent left-leaning, wishy-washy, Marxist-bothering liberal. Just glimpsing at Anaconda’s leering close-ups of female curves and broad butts, while disconcerting for me, is frankly more stereotypical than Swift’s more family-friendly fare. Why? Because it shamelessly objectifies and perpetuates the vicious myth of the hypersexualised black female, a racist image not seen so boldly in abundance since the 1970s. It’s the sort of thing that makes album covers of nude (not naked) black women on funk records of that same era look innocent, artful and lovably kitsch (even cute), redolent of an era where the kind of unabashed racial and sexual politics of today were barely considered, let alone used to sell music.

What’s most troubling and disheartening is that young women will see nothing of worth or optimism in Swift’s plainly decent video, such is the hysterical waves of scrutiny it has attracted (and will, sadly, continue to attract). Even more saddening is the fact that, to many young black women, the sight of Nicki Minaj’s flaunting her butt-cheeks may inadvertently become another female body and racial standard by which they’ll feel compelled to live up to; not that there isn’t anything in Minaj’s video to champion - like, for instance, the need for all women to freely express their sexuality how they like without the threat of criticism, something it has somewhat failed to do, demonstrated by this very article - but there’s a foul sense that what Minaj is selling isn’t what women or female-fronted pop actually needs. It’s set against an era when Warpaint can be accused of internalised misogyny for pouring scorn on Beyonce and Rihanna for taking, what they feel is, female empowerment backwards; surely, any criticism shouldn’t be directed at Warpaint but the way in which female pop stars in marketing in the first place. Moreover, Warpaint perhaps have any every right to discuss how they feel about other female artists - it is, after all, a women’s issue. And that’s probably why I’m not exactly qualified to make the case for Taylor Swift: I’m just a young black male and crucially not a young black female, nor one who pays strict attention to the pop charts. Therefore it means my only contribution to this wildly quarrelsome discourse may simply have to be that I preferred Taylor’s song better.

August 2014
22
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Rise and shine, sleeping beauty!
↳ Disney Princesses + waking up

#Disney   
August 2014
21
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August 2014
21
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tastefullyoffensive:

[@earldibblesjr]

August 2014
21
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August 2014
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dicaeopolis:

camwyn:

eternalravendreamer:

brodinsons:

oldandnewfirm:

beckyybarnes:

Vin Diesel does the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

If Michelle Obama nominates her husband and he starts a chain of world leaders nominating each other I am going to laugh so hard

Alas, the President was already challenged- Ethel Kennedy called him out on August 10th. He’s just doing the monetary donation instead.

On the other hand there’s a whole Congress full of leaders that I, for one, would GLADLY donate money to an ALS charity in order to see doused in ice water. Just sayin’.

George Bush already did it, and nominated Bill Clinton.

This is the best thing I’ve seen all year.

August 2014
21
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August 2014
21
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Chris Evans takes the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge